Ghana: More money lost in corruption than received on Chinese grants

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The country ranks as seventh wealthiest country in Africa. But it still loses more money due to corruption as it is receiving aid from China.

China is investing a lot into African countries. But aid is not given as generous as from Western European countries. Normally, there is always a return service associated with this. In most cases, the money goes into infrastructure projects, which in turn are carried out by Chinese companies. 

This also applies to Ghana. “We have spent a couple of years begging China for $2 billion we will pay for. This brings excitement that it will be used to transform Ghana’s infrastructure.” This statement is from no one less than Samson Lardy Anyenini, renowned TV journalist and Chairman for the disciplinary committee of Ghana Football Association. And he adds: “But it is estimated that the country loses $3 billion each year to grand corruption – that’s twice the aid money we get.” And the figure seems to be correct. The Ghana Integrity Initiative has issued it in August, according to www.ghanaweb.com.

This numbers show the dimension in which corruption is taking place, not only in Ghana but in Africa in general. A new discussion about a whistleblower reward program raises in Ghana. Transparency International supports such ideas: “Several countries, such as the U.S., Canada and South Korea, have introduced whistleblower reward programmes that aim to increase the quantity of disclosures about cases of corruption, fraud, misconduct and other illegal activities. These mechanisms award whistleblowers with a payment if their information leads to successful prosecution or recovery of funds. Some analysis suggests that these programmes are successful as they incentivise individuals or groups to come forward with information and counter-balance the possible dangers of blowing the whistle.” 

This discussion (and the dimension of corruption in Ghana) is certainly finding willing ears within the European Union. The European Development Fund invests annually 323 million euros to Ghana.